Daily Knitter Blog

A Quick and easy Knitting Project: Fingerless Mitts

July 10th, 2018

Hey Knitters,

Try this fun project. The video below will show you how to knit fingerless glove quickly. You will master the art of making and designing your own gloves. This is a great project for beginners who want to learn how to knit and make knitting garments. This project is so easy you can make several gloves in a matter of hours. For more information about this knitting project click on the link below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvNWmpW9DOw

 

The Weight, Thickness and Labels of Yarn

June 30th, 2018

 

Hey Knitters,

When choosing yarn to knit a project, look at the yarn label to determine the type of yarn needed. Also, the range of yarn is listed under the brand name of the yarn.

There is a number category that is listed on each individual skein of yarn from 1 to 6 and it has a 10cm/4inch gauge symbol. The swatch gauge is knitted in stockinette stitch with the recommended needle size.

We will begin with yarn weights which are listed in stages of thickness. Category 1, the super fine yarn, also referred to as fingering weight yarn, for knitting lace and baby garments.

However, the fine weight yarn listed in category 2, known as a light sports or baby sport yarn, is used for a variety of knitting projects.

Thus, the light-weight yarn, referred to as knitting worsted (a generic yarn) is listed in category 3. This yarn is a thicker yarn than the sports-weight and produces a bulkier garment.

A medium worsted yarn category 4 is used to knit Afghans or throws. For such crafts as rugs or outdoor wear a bulky yarn is required category 5. Super bulky yarn is the last category, which is used for knitting heavy jacket or coat.

New stitch: Lattice Stitch

June 20th, 2018

Hey Knitters,

The knit lattice stitch is a very lovely pattern stitch to create and design baby blankets, Afghans or throws. It is not a difficult stitch pattern to learn but it takes time and patience. However, the lattice stitch is worth the wait once when you see the end results.

 

Knit multiples of 16 + 2 stitches

knit a swatch gauge for example 16 x 2=32 +2=34

 

Abbreviations:

Right Twist (RT): knit 2 stitches together and leave the stitches on left needle. Knit the next 2 stitches same as the previous 2 stitches. Then slip both stitches from left needle together.

Left Twist (LT): skip the next stitch and knit into the back of the next loop. Then Knit into the back of both the second and skipped stitches.

 

Wrong Side (WS)

Row 1: Purl all odd rows on (WS).

Row 2: k1, *LT, k4, RT, repeat from *, end with k1.

Row 4: K2, *LT, K2, RT, K2, repeat from *

Row 6: k3, *LT, RT, k4, repeat from *, end last repeat k3.

Row 8: k4, *RT, k6, rep from *, end last repeat k4.

Row 10: k3, *RT, LT, k4 repeat from *, end last repeat k3.

Row 12: K2, *RT, K2, LT, K2, repeat from *.

Row 14: k1, *RT, k4, LT, repeat from *, end with k1.

Row 16: k8, *LT, k6, repeat from *, end with K2.

Repeat rows 1- 16 for a pattern stitch.

 

Curve or Slopes

 

Slopes/curves are never easy to calculate for new knitting beginners (some experienced knitters have a problem too). The slopes/curves take some time and effort to work them out to the right shape.

Knitting curves involve calculating series of small slope. However, these slopes have a continuing angle slope change. For example, a sleeve cap which has two curves/slopes and looks like a bell. Thus, each slope has to be calculated separately when adding or subtracting stitches.

In a curve slope, for instance, you would decrease 1 stitch every few rows then, decrease 1 stitch every other row and 1 stitch every 3rd row to complete the curve shape. This method makes each segment of the slope curve smooth and different from each other.

Intervals of a curve are the equivalent of steps and include the number of stitches that are decreased evenly along the row(s). An example of intervals is given below:

A sleeve cap has a gauge of 7.4 rows per inch that is decreased over 5 inches. Calculations below:

7.4 x 5=37 rows

37 rows /5 =7 rows per intervals/steps, 2 remaining: calculation 5-2=3

5 intervals/steps, 2 remaining

Now you have 3 steps with 7 rows and 2 steps with 8 rows.

Now this should read: decrease 3 rows 7xs then every 2nd row 8 xs.

Designing and Sketching Your Own Garment

June 10th, 2018

Hey Knitters,

The knit lattice stitch is a very lovely pattern stitch to create and design baby blankets, Afghans or throws. It is not a difficult stitch pattern to learn but it takes time and patience. However, the lattice stitch is worth the wait when you see the end results.

 

Knit multiples of 16 + 2 stitches

knit a swatch gauge for example 16 x 2=32 +2=34

 

Abbreviations:

Right Twist (RT): knit 2 stitches together and leave the stitches on left needle. Knit the next 2 stitches same as the previous 2 stitches. Then slip both stitches from left needle together.

Left Twist (LT): skip the next stitch and knit into the back of the next loop. Then Knit into the back of both the second and skipped stitches.

 

Wrong Side (WS)

Row 1: Purl all odd rows on (WS).

Row 2: k1, *LT, k4, RT, repeat from *, end with k1.

Row 4: K2, *LT, K2, RT, K2, repeat from *

Row 6: k3, *LT, RT, k4, repeat from *, end last repeat k3.

Row 8: k4, *RT, k6, rep from *, end last repeat k4.

Row 10: k3, *RT, LT, k4 repeat from *, end last repeat k3.

Row 12: K2, *RT, K2, LT, K2, repeat from *.

Row 14: k1, *RT, k4, LT, repeat from *, end with k1.

Row 16: k8, *LT, k6, repeat from *, end with K2.

Repeat rows 1- 16 for a pattern stitch.

 

Curve or Slopes

 

Slopes/curves are never easy to calculate for new knitting beginners (some experienced knitters have a problem too). The slopes/curves take some time and effort to work them out to the right shape.

Knitting curves involve calculating series of small slope. However, these slopes have a continuing angle slope change. For example, a sleeve cap which has two curves/slopes and looks like a bell. Thus, each slope has to be calculated separately when adding or subtracting stitches.

In a curve slope, for instance, you would decrease 1 stitch every few rows then, decrease 1 stitch every other row and 1 stitch every 3rd row to complete the curve shape. This method makes each segment of the slope curve smooth and different from each other.

Intervals of a curve are the equivalent of steps and include the number of stitches that are decreased evenly along the row(s). An example of intervals is given below:

A sleeve cap has a gauge of 7.4 rows per inch that is decreased over 5 inches. Calculations below:

7.4 x 5=37 rows

37 rows /5 =7 rows per intervals/steps, 2 remaining: calculation 5-2=3

5 intervals/steps, 2 remaining

Now you have 3 steps with 7 rows and 2 steps with 8 rows.

Now this should read: decrease 3 rows 7xs then every 2nd row 8 xs.

Checkerboard Bow Stitch Pattern

May 30th, 2018

Hey Knitters,

This novelty stitch is knitted in multiples of 16 + 9 stitches. However, to work a 4 repeat pattern, multiply 4 x 16 then adds 9 additional stitches. This pattern is also worked with a triple yarn over the knitting needle. To complete this stitch wrap the yarn around the needle clockwise 3 times until the yarn is returned to the back of the garment in a knitting position.

Work a 4 x 4 test swatch to familiarize yourself with the stitch. Use any size knitting needles you desire.

Checkerboard Pattern

Cast on the desired number of stitches.

Row 1: Start on the right side of your garment and knit across to the end.

Row 2: knit 4 stitches, * work a triple yo (triple yarn over), knit 1, triple yo, knit 15 then repeat from * ending the last repeat with a knit 4.

Row 3: knit 4, * drop 3 yos, knit 1, drop 3 yos repeat from * ending the last repeat with a knit 4.

Create Pattern Bows

Insert your empty needle into the 2 of loops then pull up on the needle to take out the slack between and on each side of the 2 loops. Remove the empty needle and tie the loops together to form a firm square knot.

Rows 4 and 6: Repeat row 2.

Row 5 and 7: repeat row3.

Row 8 and 9: knit across to end.

Row 10: knit 12 stitches, *work a triple yo, knit 1, triple yo, and knit 15 stitches the repeat from *ending the last repeat knit 12 stitches.

Row 11: knit 12 stitches, * drop 3 yos, knit 1, drop 3 yos then knit stitches repeat from * ending last repeat with knit 12. Tie all bows to form a firm square knot.

Row 12 and 14 repeat row 10.

Row 13 and 15 repeat row 11.

Row 16: knit across row.

Repeat rows: 1 to 16

The Importance of a 4″ x 4″ (10cm) Swatch Gauge by Terrie Sewell

May 20th, 2018

Hey Knitters,

Every individual who knits completes their craft differently than another knitters. For instance, some knitters might knit more or less stitches and rows when making the garment. This can cause the garment to be knitted too big, lopsided or too small. That is why it’s important to knit a swatch gauge. Regardless of how you complete your knitting project, do not forget that the type of knitting needles used is also an important factor when making a swatch gauge.

1. Knit a 4" x 4" swatch or square using the same yarn that you are going to use for your project. For example, cast on 20 stitches on an empty knitting needle and knit approximately 10 rows in the stockinette stitch. Stockinette stitch consist of knitting one row and purling the next.

2. When you are finished, dampen or wash your sample swatch before measuring and blocking it. Do this according to the manufacturer’s instruction on the label. Pin the swatch on a clean surface and allow the swatch to dry. Treat it like you would treat you finished garment.

3. Look at the label on the package of yarn to match the stitch and rows per inch gauge recommended for the yarn that you purchased (instructions). If they match your stitch and row count then you are ready to start knitting.

 

However, if they do not match, and you have too many stitches and rows, then you are knitting too tightly. For those who knit tightly you will have to use a larger knitting needle to get the correct gauge. On the other hand, if you have fewer stitches and rows then you are knitting too loosely. Then you have to use smaller knitting needles.

Tips

If you are knitting a garment in stockinette or cable stitch you need to block and stretch out the swatch before measuring.

You can purchase a swatch gauge counter at your local craft store, if you do not want to count the number of stitches and rows.

Counting the Stitches and Rows of a 10 x10 Swatch Gauge

May 10th, 2018

Hey Knitters,

 

1. Knit a 4" x 4" inch square called a swatch or a swatch gauge using the same yarn you intend to knit your garment. However, if you knit a larger swatch, then use a tape measure to measure out a 4 x 4 inch area.

2. Wash and treat the swatch according to the instructions on the package.

3. Let the swatch dry completely.

4. Count the number of stitches in your 4 x 4 inch swatch. For instance, you might count 20 stitches along the width of your swatch. However, depending on the number of stitches cast on your knitting needle you might count more stitches. In that case measure, tape and pin a 4 x 4 inch square of fabric.

5. Divide the number of stitches by the width of your swatch to equal the stitches per inch. For example, 20 stitches /4 the width of swatch = 5 stitches per inch. Example 20/4=5. The calculation represents stitch/inch.

6. Count the number of rows and do the math. For instance, you might count 13 rows by the length of your swatch. However, depending on the number of rows knitted and the size of the knitting needles you might have more rows.

7. Divide the number of rows by the length of the swatch this will equal the row per inch.For example, 13 stitches /4 the width of swatch equal 3.25 stitches per inch. Example 13/4=3.25. The calculation represents stitch/inch.

Domino or Mitered Knitting

April 30th, 2018


Hey Knitters,

 

As a beginner or an advanced knitter you can make use of this unique method of knitting called the mitered or domino knitting. The stitch might look complicated or a little difficult but it is simple and very easy to learn and knit.

Mitered knitting is a form of knitting that connects or joins squares together at 45 degree angles. Also, mitered square are knitted adjacent to each other, diagonal or across rows. In other words, mitered knitting allows you to stack one square on the top or on the side of another square until your garment is completed.

For example, when knitting a craft such as as scarf, you complete one square and at the same time began another square. This method consists of picking up stitches from the previous square and adding the stitches to the knitting needle. This technique starts a new square without binding stitches off the needle or binding off the previous squares.

For those of you who want to learn the mitered technique of knitting click on the website http://www.knittingatknoon.com/afghanpatt.html to observe how mitered knitting an afghan is done. You can also check out the website below for a step by step example of mitered knitting. http://www.planetshoup.com/easy/knit/mitre_bas.shtml

Stitch of the Week: Chevron Stitch Pattern

April 20th, 2018

Hey Knitters,

The Chevron Stitch is a nice stitch to knit for baby blankets, scarves, socks and hats. So gather you knitting needles and yarn and start to knit something special for that friend or family member.

Multiple of 8 stitches + 1. For example, 8 x2=16, 16+1= 17 total stitches to cast on your knitting needles. Work the calculations for a 4 x 4 swatch gauge to practice this stitch.

 

Row 1: k1, *p7, k1; rep from * to the end of row.

Row 2: p1, *k7, p1; rep from * to the end of row.

Row 3: K2, *p5, k3; rep from *, end p5, K2.

Row 4: p2, *k5, p3; rep from *, end k5, p2

Row 5: k3, *p3, k5; rep from*, end p3, k3.

Row 6: p3, *k3, p5; rep from *, end k3, p3.

Row 7: k4, *p1, k7; rep from *, end p1, k4.

Row 8: p4, *k1, p7; rep from *, end k1, p4.

Row 9: Rep Row 2

Row 10: Rep Row 1

Row 11: Rep Row 4

Row 12: Rep Row 3

Row 13: Rep Row 6

Row 14: Rep Row 5

Row 15: Rep Row 8

Row 16: Rep Row 7

Repeat rows 1 through 16 for stitch pattern

Buttonholes made Easier

April 10th, 2018

Hey Knitters,

Making a buttonhole is easy if you know the steps. However, some knitters may prefer not to put buttonholes or buttons on knitted garment for certain reasons. For example, they might think the sweater or vest looks better without buttons or they prefer to use Velcro strips for convenience. For those of you who want to learn about knitting buttonholes. We will begin with the buttonholes that are worked over one row.

 

Buttonhole Instructions

Knit to the area where the first buttonhole will be located then start your buttonhole of the right side.

1. Place the yarn to the front of the garment then slip the next stitch purlwise from the left hand needle to the right-hand needle. Then return the yarn to the back of the garment and keep it in that position. * Slip the next stitch and then pass the stitch that was previously slipped over repeat from * until all the stitches for the buttonhole is completed. This is the last step for the bottom row of the buttonhole: Place the last bound off stitch back on the left hand needle. Turn garment.

 

2. With yarn to the back of the garment work cable cast on: The cable cast- on is used when a knitter needs to add stitches within the garment that is knitted.

Begin by * inserting the right hand needle between the first and second stitch on the left hand needle, wrap the yarn around as if the knit. Pull the loop through and then position the loop on the left hand needle repeat from * until the upper length of the buttonhole matches the length of the bottom buttonhole including 1 extra bound off stitch. Turn garment.

3. Place yarn to the back of the garment. Slip the first stitch from the left hand needle then pass the rest of the cable cast-on stitches over it.